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dc.contributor.creatorFlannery, Eoin
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T15:08:18Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T15:08:18Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationFlannery, E., 2013. “‘A Land Poisoned’: Eugene McCabe and Irish Postcolonial Gothic”, in Literature and History, Vol. 22, No.2, 91-112.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10395/2194
dc.description.abstractWhile many of Eugene McCabe’s works adhere to the recognisable features of literary naturalism, including a fraught exposition of character, realist narrative language and pessimistic tone, it is my intention to spotlight the formal Gothic dimensions of these literary fictions. I will address, primarily, his most accomplished work to date, the novel Death and Nightingales and his acclaimed, and later televised, short story trilogy, ‘Cancer’, ‘Heritage’ and ‘Victims’. Land and violence are at the core of these narratives and, while the later novel is set in a pre-partition context, many of the same political strains surface across the stories. Appropriation, division, loyalty, and threat are pivotal to the narrative momentum of McCabe’s tales, as the author seeks to relate the indelible traumas that stain the physical and cultural landscape of both a pre-partition Ulster and post-partition borderland.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherManchester University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLiterature and History;Vol. 22, No.2,
dc.rights.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.7227/LH.22.2.6en_US
dc.subjectEugene McCabeen_US
dc.subjectPostcolonial Gothicen_US
dc.subjectIrish Gothicen_US
dc.subject‘Big House’ Fictionen_US
dc.title"A Land Poisoned": Eugene McCabe and Irish Postcolonial Gothicen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.supercollectionmic_published_revieweden_US
dc.description.versionYesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7227/LH.22.2.6


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